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Welcome! We are committed to recruiting and retaining a world-class workforce for the American people.

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graphic with Shades of tan background. Primary image is a sphere colored orange. Dark brown colored headline: ASIAN AMERICAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER HERITAGE MONTH 2016. Dark colored subtext: EMBRACE DIFFERENCES- MANY CULTURES, ONE WALK.

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage (AAPI) Month and is the perfect opportunity for us to celebrate the vast contributions AAPI communities make to both our nation and as part of the Federal workforce that serves the American people.

In the first year of his administration, the President signed an executive order reestablishing the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (WHIAAPI) and the President’s Advisory Commission on AAPIs.

The President’s commitment to this fastest-growing racial group in our country has extended to every corner of his administration.

At OPM, I’m grateful that Kiran Ahuja, who for six years was the Executive Director of the WHIAAPI, now serves as our Chief of Staff. Michelle Lee serves as the Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Chris Lu is the Deputy Secretary of Labor. Vice Admiral Vivek Murthy is the nation’s Surgeon General. Nani Coloretti serves as Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Deputy Secretary. And Esther Kia’aina is an Assistant Secretary at the Department of the Interior. These are just a few of the AAPI members who serve throughout the Administration.

As the President reminded us in his proclamation celebrating this month, AAPIs make up “one of the most culturally and linguistically diverse groups in America.” We should celebrate this diversity and also work to make sure that the Federal Government is providing the appropriate level and type of services to these varied communities.

“We are working across government to improve data collection to counter existing stereotypes and to shed light on the realities faced and resources needed by the AAPI community,” the President also said in his proclamation. 

As the AAPI population has grown, it has become increasingly clear that AAPI communities vary by immigration patterns, socioeconomic status, educational attainment, wealth accumulation, and much more.

In order to provide more accurate and meaningful information on the AAPI community to both policymakers and the public, Federal agencies are working to provide disaggregated AAPI data – that is data by individual ethnicities – whenever possible.

For example, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s American Housing Survey now includes AAPI subgroup data. The Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics Labor Force Characteristics by Race and Ethnicity report includes unemployment rates and other labor force estimates for seven Asian subgroups.

Here at OPM, our AAPI employee resource group (ERG) engages in a number of activities to support AAPI employees including brown bag luncheons, panels, other internal events for OPM staff, and shares vacancy announcements with its members. We have partnered with our AAPI ERG to encourage and promote participation in career development programs. And, we are looking forward to its upcoming AAPI Heritage Month event on Tuesday, May 24 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This wide-ranging panel discussion on diversity and the Federal workforce will feature some of the talented AAPI leaders in the Administration.

I encourage all Federal employees to celebrate the contributions our AAPI colleagues make every day to the Federal Government’s ability to fulfill its mission. And we should all encourage more AAPIs to join our Federal family.


graphic with white background and red bars coming from the top down to the center. Primary image is blue, faded green, with 2 black stars on each side of the headline which reads: PUBLIC SERVICE. Subhead with small red star from onto: RECOGNITION WEEK.

Last week was another great Public Service Recognition Week. Together, we took time to reflect on the great work our Federal workforce does every day. I am continually impressed by the dedication and commitment our two million-strong Federal workforce has to serving the American people. And here at OPM, whether it’s helping agencies make sure employees have the tools and training they need to do their jobs, administering health benefits for Federal workers, retirees and their families, or helping our nation’s veterans transition into Federal civilian service, our team works hard to help agencies across government fulfill their missions.

The President said it best in his annual PSRW proclamation: “Civil servants demonstrate resolve and inspire optimism in sectors throughout our country. They are engineers and educators, military service members and social workers, and their individual and collective contributions drive us forward on the path toward an ever brighter tomorrow.  Both at home and abroad, they carry forward the notion that as Americans, we are committed to looking out for one another and to working together to forge a bright future for generations to come.”

Last week, I co-authored an op-ed with Max Stier, president and CEO of the Partnership for Public Service. In it we highlighted some of the good work Federal employees do every single day. We know that Federal employees work hard to serve the American people.   Whether it’s processing Social Security checks, fighting wildfires, or searching for the next groundbreaking cancer treatment – Federal employees deliver the services the American people need.

Many Federal employees do some pretty amazing things in their jobs. In the op-ed, we highlighted a few of this year’s Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal – or “Sammie” – finalists. Among them were Dr. Paul McGann, Jean D. Moody-Williams, and Dennis Wagner, three Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services employees who have been working tirelessly for the past four years to reduce medical errors and avoidable infections in hospitals. Their efforts have led to 2.1 million fewer patients harmed and 87,000 lives saved.

We also showcased Lisa Jones of the Department of the Treasury. Lisa designed a program to help low-income communities get access to money to fund health-care centers, charter schools, housing, and small businesses.

And, I was proud to mention that one of the Sammie finalists is OPM’s own Kimya Lee and our Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey team. Those team members include: Kim Wells, Craig Simons, Rose Miller, Taylor Lewis, Shannon Lewis, Stephanie Westphal, Lauren Sobek, Karl Hess, Mari Raviele, Megan Poore, and Lorraine Latimore. Each year, this talented team analyzes survey data and creates thousands of reports managers can use to help them improve employee engagement and productivity throughout the Federal service.

There are countless more examples in every Federal agency of employees doing equally innovative and groundbreaking work. Without Federal employees, this country simply would not run. So for that, we should all be grateful. 

I want to again thank each and every Federal employee for the work you do every day – often behind the scenes – to keep our country running efficiently, safely, and productively.

Each May, we stop and make time to let Federal employees know how much they are valued and appreciated for the work they do. But even when it’s not Public Service Recognition Week, know that the President, me, and all Federal leaders recognize, honor, and are grateful for the work that you do. 


On the left, Bronze scales on top of stack of books with gavel laying next to the pile. Words on the left say Partnering to recruit administrative law judges


Beth Cobert is the Acting Director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management

Carolyn Colvin is the Acting Commissioner of the Social Security Administration

Every day agencies across the Federal Government come together to provide important services to the American people.  This spring, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Social Security Administration (SSA) joined forces to recruit prospective candidates for administrative law judge (ALJ) positions.  ALJs are integral to SSA and other agencies to make impartial decisions on such issues as disability determinations, licensing, or grievances.  Nearly 2,000 ALJs work in 27 Federal agencies across the government.

SSA’s hearing and appeals operation is one of the largest administrative adjudicative systems in the world.  OPM provides agencies with certificates of well-qualified ALJ candidates, drawn from a robust register, to fill vacant positions.  We are happy to report that OPM recently issued an announcement for entry-level ALJ positions on USAJOBS, which yielded more than 5,000 applications.  

In the coming months, OPM will review qualifications and complete the thorough approval process by which applicants who successfully complete both online and in-person assessments of the examination will be added to the ALJ register.  In addition to scheduling the current administration of the exam, OPM replenished the existing ALJ register with new candidates who successfully completed the 2013 administration of the examination. OPM also opens the examination on a quarterly basis to disabled veterans and certain individuals who are entitled to veterans’ preference in relation to disabled veterans.

SSA and OPM are committed to continuing to work together to fulfill this important government function.


Image of a stressed out man in the background with transparent blue cover. Headline: BAN THE BOX.

Each year, more than 600,000 people are released from Federal and State prisons, and millions more are released from local jails. One in three working-age Americans has an arrest record. Many face long-term, sometimes lifelong, impacts of a criminal record that prevent them from getting a job or accessing housing, higher education, loans, credit, and more.  Such barriers hurt public safety, add costs to the taxpayer, and damage the fabric of our communities. Removing these barriers and promoting the rehabilitation and reintegration of people who have paid their debt to society is a critical piece of the Administration’s efforts to make the nation’s criminal justice system more fair and effective.  

This week is National Reentry Week—a chance to call attention to the urgency of criminal justice reform and to highlight the ongoing work across the Federal government to remove barriers to reentry for people returning to their communities. Here at the Office of Personnel Management, we are doing our part.

Today, OPM issued a proposed rule that would ensure that applicants with a criminal history have a fair shot to compete for Federal jobs. The rule would effectively “ban the box” for a significant number of positions in the Federal Government by delaying the point in the hiring process when agencies can inquire about an applicant’s criminal history until a conditional offer is made. This change prevents candidates from being eliminated before they have a chance to demonstrate their qualifications.

Earlier inquiries into an applicant’s criminal history may discourage motivated, well-qualified individuals who have served their time from applying for a Federal job. Early inquiries could also lead to the premature disqualification of otherwise eligible candidates, regardless of whether an arrest actually resulted in a conviction, or whether consideration of an applicant’s criminal history is justified by business necessity. These barriers to employment unnecessarily narrow the pool of eligible and qualified candidates for federal employment, and also limit the opportunity for those with criminal histories to support themselves and their families.  

This Administration is committed to pursuing public policies that promote fairness and equality. As the nation’s largest employer, the Federal Government should lead the way and serve as a model for all employers – both public and private.

The proposed rule builds on the current practice of many agencies, which already choose to collect information on criminal history at late stages of the hiring process. The rule would take the important step to codify, formalize, and expand this best practice.

There are certain times when an agency might be justified in disqualifying an applicant with criminal history, or collecting information on their background, earlier in the process. Therefore, OPM will set up a mechanism for agencies to request exceptions. These will be granted on a case-by-case basis. These exceptions could be granted either by individual position, or by class of positions, depending on the specifics of the case. For example, cases could include certain law enforcement jobs that require the ability to testify in court, or jobs where applicants undergo extensive and costly training before they are offered a job.

Banning the box for Federal hiring is an important step. It sends a clear signal to applicants, agencies, and employers across the country that the Federal Government is committed to making it easier for those who have paid their debts to society to successfully return to their communities, while staying true to the merit system principles that govern our civil service by promoting fair competition between applicants from all segments of society.

To view the proposed rule, you can visit the Federal Register.


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This week OPM held its inaugural Diversity and Inclusion Collaboration and Innovation Summit at the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters. We brought together individuals from across government who are committed and passionate about finding innovative ways to fulfill the President’s Management Agenda’s goal of creating a more diverse, inclusive, and engaged Federal workforce.

I was happy to kick off the two-day summit by stressing that we need to think about diversity and inclusion not as something “nice” to have, but as a “must have.” Diverse workforces can draw from the expertise, backgrounds, and experiences of individuals from every community in this country. When we have more diverse talent, we can better fulfill our mission to provide excellent service to the American people.

Our national security leaders, for example, recognize that increasing diversity in their ranks would help enrich the insights and perspectives they need to protect the security of America.


The people who attended this two-day summit know the basics. But the basics aren’t enough. To make real progress, we need to tackle the hard stuff. We need to not only have a diverse group of leaders around the decision table, we need to actually seek everyone’s input and make it part of the decision-making process.

All employees should feel valued when they come to work. They need to know that their opinions matter, that they are respected as individuals, and that they have an impact on the important work their agencies are doing. That’s what drives real employee engagement.

One big success we have already seen across government is in hiring people with disabilities. In 2010, the President issued an Executive Order directing Federal agencies to hire 100,000 people with disabilities. I am happy to say that we’ve exceeded that goal, thanks in part to a tool called the Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP). The WRP helps hiring managers find qualified students with disabilities who are just starting out in their careers. The WRP, which is managed jointly by the Departments of Labor and Defense, has more than 1800 names that Federal managers can tap into to find qualified candidates in fields ranging from health care to computer specialists.

That is just one example of the many creative solutions we are seeing across government. We have seen innovative ways of attracting diverse hires in the STEM field, including women and underrepresented minorities. I hope the summit will generate countless other ideas that we will likely be talking about at summits to come.

In the meantime, keep the discussion going - in every agency, office, and on every team. Share your ideas. Nothing is too bold. We need everyone’s help to make the Federal government the model workforce for the American people. It’s only when we remember that diversity cannot be an add-on to your mission, but is critical to it, that we will get the transformation we need.

Photo of Acting Director Colbert presenting the Diversity and Inclusion Drives Innovation at the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters.


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