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Calling all Federal employees: Have you taken the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey?

The FEVS, which OPM administers, is a powerful management tool that helps your senior leaders and managers drive change at your agency. The data we get from your responses tells us what is working and what we can do better. While taking this survey is voluntary, your responses are crucial to helping us make your workplace the best it can be.



There are a few myths associated with the FEVS. The video above addresses the most common of them. Most importantly, I want to assure you that your responses are kept entirely confidential. Your supervisor will never know how you answered.

Most employees will receive a link inviting them to participate in the survey. But especially in larger agencies, not everyone will. The FEVS is administered to full-time and part-time permanent, non-seasonal employees of departments and large agencies, as well as the small/independent agencies that choose to participate. This year, more than 800,000 employees have been asked to fill out the surveys. So check your inbox. See if there is a link waiting for you.

If you’re not sure if you received an invitation, look for an email from opm.gov. Be sure to only click on your own link, not one forwarded to you by a colleague. They are personalized specifically to you.

I know how hard you work. Despite the challenges we face, we have persevered and continue to get the job done for the American people. That’s why your input is so important. This survey gives you the opportunity to share your opinions, your concerns, and your praise. Tell us what’s working and what’s not. Help your leadership help you. When it comes to understanding what it’s like to work in your agency, you are the expert.

The survey closes this Friday, June 13. Don’t wait. Your response will make the difference.



June is LGBT Pride Month. One of the best ways to celebrate this community is by making sure that its members have the same rights and benefits as the rest of our Federal family.

LGBT Pride Month was created as a way to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan, which were a tipping point in the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. What began as “Gay Pride Day,” has grown to a month-long series of events around the country. These commemorations also include memorials for members of the community who have been lost to hate crimes and HIV/AIDS.

President Obama has appointed more than 300 openly LGBT professionals to serve in his administration -- more openly LGBT presidential appointees than all previous administrations combined. They include:  John Berry, Ambassador to Australia and formerly Director of OPM; Rufus Gifford, Ambassador to Denmark; Fred P. Hochberg, Chairman and President of the Import-Export Bank of the United States; and Kathy Martinez, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy at DOL.

The President has also appointed more than a dozen openly gay Federal judges. They include Elaine Kaplan, a judge of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and a former Acting Director and General Counsel of OPM.

Banner with the text Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month 2014

One of my highest priorities as Director of OPM is ensuring the diversity of our Federal workforce and a workplace where every employee feels respected, safe and valued.

OPM has been at the forefront of ensuring benefits the Federal Government offers are as inclusive as possible. In the past several years, we have adjusted policies so that same-sex domestic partners now qualify for many benefits, from using the Family and Medical Leave Act to take care of a partner’s ill son or daughter to getting help from an agency’s Employee Assistance Programs.

We have also amended the regulations that set the definitions related to family member and immediate relative in order to clarify that they cover same-sex and opposite-sex domestic partners. So when an employee with a same-sex partner needs to use sick leave, funeral leave, leave transfer, or the leave bank, he or she has the same benefits as employees with opposite-sex partners.

And following the Supreme Court’s ruling last June that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was unconstitutional, OPM began immediately adjusting policies and regulations to reflect that change. This included extending health care and retirement benefits to employees in same-sex marriages, and clarifying that employees could take FMLA leave to care for same-sex spouses.

OPM will be holding an LGBT Information Webcast on these and many other benefits from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. on June 18. Federal employees and benefits managers will get an overview of benefits since the repeal of Section 3 of DOMA and be able to ask questions of our benefit officers.

As the President said in his proclamation declaring June LGBT Pride Month: “We celebrate victories that have affirmed freedom and fairness, and we recommit ourselves to completing the work that remains.”


Among the many great honors I have had as Director of the Office of Personnel Management is being able to welcome our country’s newest citizens. I had that pleasure again this past weekend when I spoke to 1,206 new Americans in Oakland, CA.

Looking out at a sea of American flags waving at the historic Paramount Theater, I was filled with awe at these new citizens’ accomplishments and with gratitude that they chose the United States of America as their new home.

These immigrants who came to our shores from 112 different countries are what America is all about: hard work, determination and community. They have followed in the tradition of millions and millions of people who for generations have come here from every corner of the globe to find a better life. In the past decade alone, more than 7 million people have pledged their allegiance to the United States and taken the oath of citizenship.

With July 4th just a little more than a month away, I know that the day on which we all celebrate our nation’s independence will have special meaning for the new citizens I welcomed in Oakland and for the thousands who will take that same oath in similar ceremonies across this great country.

Director Archuleta speaking at a podium at a Naturalization ceremony in San Francisco


Director Shaking Hands with Soldier and Laughing with other soldier in background.As we get ready to commemorate Memorial Day weekend and enjoy the first outdoor celebration of the season, I hope all of us will take a moment to reflect on the meaning of this holiday: to remember the brave men and women who gave their lives in service to the United States as members of the armed forces.

What you may not know is that Memorial Day used to be called Decoration Day. That’s the name General John Logan gave the holiday when he originated it on May 5, 1868. On May 30 of that year, and every year since, flowers have been placed on the graves of soldiers at Arlington Cemetery and on the graves of military heroes throughout our great country. And over this weekend, loved ones, military members and Americans from every corner of this nation will place flowers on the resting places of our fallen heroes.

Here at the headquarters of the Office of Personnel Management, we are paying tribute to our fallen service members with a Missing Military Service Member table. The table contains several small items that all hold a special significance. An upside down wine glass is a reminder that the missing cannot join their loved ones in toasts. A single red rose signifies the blood that was shed to ensure our freedom. And a candle, to light the way home. The table honors the great sacrifices made by so many, particularly prisoners of war and those missing in action.

Staff Standing around table for fallen soldiers.

Since becoming OPM Director more than six months ago, I have had the honor to meet with veterans at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio and Thursday at Fort Carson and Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs.

Their stories of courage and resolve inspire me. I met with service members and their families who attended a Military and Veterans Employment Expo in Colorado Springs. Federal agencies and private employers talked  with service members about making the transition to civilian life and with Veterans looking for a new career opportunity. I also talked with women service members about their options as they face their own decisions about their futures.

I am very proud that this past year was another record year for hiring Veterans for the Federal workforce. Of the 162,000 Federal employees we hired in fiscal 2013, 50,000 were Veterans. And we want to keep that number growing. I am thankful that after serving our country while in uniform, so many Veterans want to continue to serve by joining the civilian Federal workforce.

So this Memorial Day, let us take a moment to think about all those who have made the ultimate sacrifice to keep our nation free. Let’s think about loved ones we have lost. Let us think about the fallen millions whose names we will never know.

And while we’re at it, let us thank the brave men and women who now wear the uniform. Thank you for your service, now and always.


Director Archuleta writes a message on Facebook message wall.

As I work to make sure we continue to build a model workforce for the 21st Century, I have been traveling around the country meeting with Federal employees, college students, faculty members and community leaders to learn from their experiences. This week, I spent some time in Silicon Valley talking to technology industry leaders about recruiting, retaining and engaging our employees.

What I learned is that cutting-edge companies like Facebook, LinkedIn and Google share many of the same goals and face many of the same challenges we do.  The leaders I met with shared some compelling insights based on their experiences. We also shared best practices that are common to private industry and government. 

Like the Federal government, businesses in Silicon Valley are competing for the best talent in their fields. And also like us, they know that attracting and retaining talent is vital. Each company has found its own, innovative way to tackle these challenges. One executive I met with talked about the need to find qualified candidates where they are. Another said that his company uses staff to act as recruiters on their own social networks.

It makes sense in today’s media environment to find ways to reach potential employees across social media platforms. We need to target qualified candidates by using the communications tools that they are already using. In order to recruit the most talented candidates in the hyper-competitive Silicon Valley environment, employers aggressively pursue candidates rather than wait for applicants to come to them. 

Just as diversity is one of my highest priorities, the same is true in Silicon Valley. I talked with officials at several companies about how important it is to have a diverse and inclusive workforce. Many of these firms are using similar tactics. Some work with underprivileged and underrepresented communities to cultivate interest in IT and related fields from an early age. Most rely heavily on internship programs as a pipeline for talent. And others turn to advocacy groups to help recruit to underrepresented groups.

Officials at these companies also agree with me that an engaged workforce is vital. They are looking for creative ways to not only improve the workplace culture, but to use that culture to attract talent.

Some technology companies use an equivalent of our Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey to provide insights into employee morale and job satisfaction and as a vehicle for employee feedback. Company officials know that employees who believe in their mission and see a collegial workplace  will want and encourage others to join them.

These companies really are a lot like the Federal government. We have the same goals and the same challenges. Our collaboration can only help to make our own efforts that more powerful.

My conversations with these companies, and others like them, are just beginning. We have agreed to maintain an ongoing dialogue and to continue to share best practices to help each other be model employers of 21st century.



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