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Our Director Director's Blog

My Brothers Keeper

Each February, our nation pauses to recognize the countless contributions African Americans have made throughout our history. They have helped shape the fabric of our society, our culture, and our growth as a country. 

One hundred years ago, Carter G. Woodson, a son of former slaves, created the Association for the Study of African-American Life & History. The association celebrated the first “Negro History Week” in February 1926. Fifty years later, in 1976, February officially became African American History Month when President Gerald Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” Each year, the association chooses a theme for the month and this year it is: A Century of Black Life, History, and Culture.

In the past century, our country has witnessed so many changes -- from the civil rights movement to the construction this year of the first National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall. African Americans have been instrumental in many of the advancements that have shaped our society and certainly our Federal workforce. Countless African Americans have served the American people, many making significant contributions to government, just as many still do today.

This month, OPM will spotlight African American Federal employees who make a difference every day. They are the history-makers of their time. These dedicated public servants carry on the promise of such trailblazing leaders as former HUD Secretary Patricia Harris, the first African American cabinet member; Jocelyn Elders, the first African American U.S. Surgeon General, and Thurgood Marshall, the first African American to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court. As the month goes on, I look forward to sharing stories of the latest generation of talented and committed African American Federal workers.

Even as we celebrate, we all know that we still have work to do. In September 2014, President Obama issued the “My Brothers Keeper” challenge. The initiative helps young people successfully make the journey from childhood through college and into a career. The program is particularly focused on helping young men of color develop the knowledge and skills necessary to unlock their full potential.  Many cities, towns, corporations, and organizations have already made a pledge to this call for action and have plans to implement their pledges over the next few years. These partnerships will not only benefit the young men being mentored, but also help the communities and neighborhoods where they live and work become stronger and more economically viable.

America wouldn’t be the nation it is today without the sacrifices and efforts of those who came before us. When we read and hear the stories of the courageous individuals who wanted to see the American dream fully realized, it reminds us that whatever our race or ethnicity, we all benefit from, and should recognize, African American history.

As President Obama says in this year’s presidential proclamation: “Like the countless, quiet heroes who worked and bled far from the public eye, we know that with enough effort, empathy, and perseverance, people who love their country can change it. Together, we can help our Nation live up to its immense promise.” 

And I know that as a Federal family, together, we will continue to live up to that promise.


On May 30, 2014, President Obama called on Americans from all walks of life to get involved in My Brother’s Keeper by signing a pledge to become long-term mentors to young people. The value of mentorship is clear – sustained and direct mentoring relationships play a vital role in the lives of young people. The President firmly believes that it is important for all children to have caring adults engaged in their lives. Mentoring a young person can make a great difference.

The My Brother’s Keeper Taskforce was established on February 27 when the President issued a Memorandum designed to “Create and Expand Ladders of Opportunity for Boys and Young Men of Color.” The taskforce’s 90-Day Report to the President prominently featured the role of mentoring.



As the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, I know how incredibly engaged and involved Federal employees are in our communities. From “Feds Feed Families” to the “Combined Federal Campaign,” you demonstrate every day that you are not only the backbone of the Federal government, but also leaders.

This week, I had the pleasure of speaking with Federal employees at a training program hosted by the Society of American Indian Government Employees (SAIGE) in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  As I told our colleagues at SAIGE, Federal workers have a noble purpose - the work that you do every day is purpose driven. Unlike private industry, it’s not about the bottom line. It’s about the top line of public service.

As I travel around the country speaking with Federal employees, I am struck by that commitment to service. From Washington, D.C. to Albuquerque, to Brownsville, Tex. to Boyers, Pa., Federal employees show up to work every day and make a difference in the lives of their fellow Americans.

As we approach Father’s Day on Sunday, I urge all of you to once again lead by example and embrace the President’s call to mentor young people. I know that many of you are already mentors in your community. For others, this may be just the motivation you need to get out there and make a difference in a young person’s life.

Please visit the White House’s My Brother’s Keeper website and sign the pledge to be a mentor today!

And Happy Father’s Day!

 

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