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Our Director Director's Blog


One of the many ways that the Office of Personnel Management helps agencies find the top talent they need to serve the American people is through the Presidential Management Fellows, our flagship leadership development program. Last week, we held our annual job fair that gives PMF finalists a chance to connect face-to-face with agency officials.

The PMF Class of 2015 is 600 strong – with 91 of the finalists taking part in our new Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) track. More than 65 agencies sent representatives to the event, held at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Kicking off the fair on Thursday, I congratulated these impressive finalists for taking the first step in their journey to becoming leaders in the Federal Government.

Not only were our finalists able to meet with agency representatives, they attended informational sessions that gave them a good grounding in the agencies’ missions and goals for the future. The finalists networked and developed contacts at the agencies.

OPM’s talented PMF staff will support these finalists as they continue their search for a fellowship. It’s very rewarding for us at OPM to help agencies recruit talented individuals who share a purpose-driven mission to serve this great country over the course of their professional careers.

The President today issued an executive order designed to further help the Federal Government attract the brightest minds in technology or innovation to work on some of the nation’s most pressing challenges. The order makes permanent the Presidential Innovation Fellows Program, which brings executives, entrepreneurs, technologists, and other innovators into government, and teams them up with Federal employees to improve programs that serve more than 150 million Americans. I’m proud to say that OPM had a role in developing this novel program, and I’m happy to see it thrive with our colleagues at the General Services Administration at the helm.

PMF 2015 finalists participate in a job fair at the NIH conference center. 

Feds Feed Families in Full Swing

Federal employees not only serve Americans every day on the job, they display their generosity throughout the year, especially through programs like Feds Feed Families. The 2015 campaign is underway this month, with the theme “Feds Fighting Hunger.” In 2014, Federal employees across government donated nearly 15 million pounds of food, paper goods, and toiletries to help food banks and pantries stay stocked during the summer months, when they traditionally see a decrease in donations.

Each year, employees are asked to bring items they want to donate to their workplaces or to take them directly to a local food bank. I’m confident that the continued generosity of our Federal workforce will ensure that we top last year’s total.

Cybersecurity Update

Working with our partners at the General Services Administration, the Office of Management and Budget, the Department of Defense, and other agencies, the government on Aug. 4, 2015 issued a request for quotations (RFQ) for a contractor to handle credit monitoring and identity theft services for people affected by the intrusion of our network. We’ve added information about the RFQ to our online cybersecurity resource center

We are continually updating our website as we get requests for more information and as we make progress on the cybersecurity front. I encourage the Federal community to keep checking the site and to continue giving us feedback. We are listening, and are working hard to provide the latest resources, information, and support for the Federal workforce.

In his memorandum for modernizing Federal leave, the President wrote, “Men and women both need time to care for their families and should have access to workplace flexibilities that help them succeed at work and at home.  Offering family leave and other workplace flexibilities to parents can help achieve the goals of recruiting and retaining talent, lowering costly worker turnover, increasing employee engagement, boosting employee morale, and ensuring a diverse and inclusive workforce.”

This week, as President Obama continues his conversations with working families across the country, OPM is proud to release a new online handbook that gives Federal employees the information they need to take advantage of the government’s many leave policies related to having a baby, adopting, or becoming foster parents.

Our Handbook on Leave and Workplace Flexibilities for Childbirth, Adoption and Foster Care provides scenarios and tips to give employees realistic and specific examples about how these policies can and should be applied. It was developed with the help of representatives from more than 40 Federal agencies, and it is an important milestone in achieving the President’s vision for Federal working families.

Federal employees will be familiar with many of our leave policies. New mothers and fathers may take at least six to eight weeks of sick leave, followed by additional time to bond with their child through annual leave or the Family Medical Leave Act. The FMLA guarantees that Federal employees may take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave within a year of the birth or adoption of a child so that new parents can have extra time with their families. I’m also proud that our government recognizes the same needs for adoptive parents, foster families, and same-sex couples.  

Our handbook also provides information about less well-known options. For example, employees can use FMLA intermittently – say, one day a week for 12 months – rather than using 12 weeks all at once. Some offices are able to offer adjusted work schedules, with flexible start and end times. For families who need some extra time at home, the perfect solution may be to switch to a part-time schedule.

The handbook shares explanations of all of these types of workplace flexibilities, and more. It has definitions and details about each type of leave, and it also has specific examples of how a Federal worker might combine different types of leave in a way that makes the most sense for his or her family. Our goal is to make our policies and regulations are as clear -- and flexible -- as possible for every employee and his or her supervisor.

To attract and retain a talented, engaged, and productive workforce, the Federal Government must ensure that employees are provided every opportunity to use workplace flexibilities that will enable them to thrive both at work and at home. We hope that this handbook will help move us toward our goal of fully supporting and empowering working parents in their roles both as Federal employees and parents.

Logo for Workplace Flexibilities Handbook for Working Families

I am excited today to release an insightful report on Women in Federal Service, which draws on OPM’s deep reservoir of data to shine a light on opportunities for women in Federal service. One of my top priorities as Director of OPM is to make sure women have a seat at every decision table. This report not only illustrates our significant progress toward that goal, but also points to what we still need to accomplish.

For me, the first step in any challenge is to take a look at the data. We looked at how women are doing in the Federal workforce from the perspectives of work-life flexibilities, opportunities to move into leadership, and pay equity.

The data revealed some positive and gratifying trend lines. Women are increasingly moving into leadership roles compared to their counterparts a decade ago. Today, they make up 34.4 percent of senior executives in the Federal Government, compared to estimates of 14.6 percent in the private sector. Younger women are doing especially well. Women entering the workforce now are more likely to be on a management track than they were a decade ago. And while we are proud of the progress we’ve made, the data shows a lingering gender gap within our Senior Executive Service. Clearly, we have work to do.  

We’ve also made great progress closing the pay gap between women and men, especially in leadership positions. Within the Senior Executive Service, the pay gap is nearly non-existent. As of 2012, women made 99.2 cents on the dollar compared to men. The gap has also closed dramatically among women in the 25-to-34 age bracket, showing that younger women are more likely to be paid similarly to their male counterparts. We’re thrilled to see so much progress.

We also know that work-life flexibilities are crucial for women – and men. They want the ability to manage their personal lives outside of work, whether that means helping to take care of children or older parents. Among women who take advantage of workplace flexibility programs, more than three-quarters are satisfied with those opportunities. 

This report is just the start. I’m committed to making sure opportunities for women in government continue to grow. Last month, I unveiled the REDI Roadmap, which stands for Recruitment, Engagement, Diversity, and Inclusion and provides a data-driven strategy for helping agencies reach one of President Obama’s major workforce goals: a diverse and inclusive Federal workforce at every level of government.

We want to make sure that women are fully represented at every level of government to create a stronger Federal service.

This is an infographic of the Women's Report from the 2014 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey results. The top of the infographic shows the web address to the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey website at and hashtag #FEVS.The infographic has 4 sections. In section 1, the title reads, Women in Federal Service, A Seat at Every Table. United States Office of Personnel Management. This section also shows a series of women and men avatars seated around a table.  OPM Director Katherine Archuleta's quote reads:  We're working hard to remove the barriers to women having seats at decision tables at every level of Federal service. In section 2, the Title reads, Leadership. Image of a pie chart that shows 14.6 percent of women executives in the private sector. Another image of a pie chart which shows 34 percent of women executives in senior executive service positions in the Federal workforce. Also in section 2, the Title reads, Workplace Flexibilities. Image of a bar chart which represents men and women who are satisfied with workplace flexibilities, like telework, child care, and the alternative work schedule. Section 3 shows images of people representing Federal employees and their family members, from babies to the elderly who benefit from work life policies. OPM Director Katherine Archuleta's quote reads,  our work life policies are continually evolving to make the balance of caring for families and pursuing a career complementary, rather than contradictory. In section 4, the title reads, Closing the Pay Gap. The subtitle reads, Federal Women Executives in senior executive service positions. Image 1 shows the amount of money females in senior executive service positions were paid to the dollar compared to their male counterparts. In 1992, it was 97.6 cents. In 2012, it was 99.2 cents. Under the subtitle, Federal Women in White Collar Jobs, in 1992, women in White Collar Jobs were paid 70 cents to the dollar. In 2012, Women in White Collar Jobs were paid 87 cents to the dollar. This section also shows women and men avatars seated around a table. Images of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management's social media accounts. Find U.S. OPM on Twitter at Find OPM Director on Twitter at Find us on Facebook at Find us on Twitter at Find us on LinkedIn at Find us on YouTube at, and find us on Instagram at very bottom of the infographic shows the web address to the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey website at and hashtag #FEVS.

My passion for building a Federal workforce that looks like the America we serve is not just about numbers. It is about the American people benefiting from the talent, the wisdom, the experience, and the insights of people from every community in this great country. We need that diversity at every level and at every decision table.

In August 2011, the President issued an executive order that called for a government-wide coordinated effort to promote diversity and inclusion within the Federal workforce. The President’s Management Agenda builds on that commitment.

At the Office of Personnel Management, we work every day to help agencies build a workforce that reflects the bright mosaic of the American people. We know we must work equally hard to be sure that once hired, employees feel included and engaged at all levels of government. Although we know there’s still much work to do, the data shows us that we are making progress on the President’s vision.

For example, four years ago, the President set a goal of hiring 100,000 people with disabilities. I am proud to say that we are more than half way toward reaching that milestone. In fact, OPM’s latest report on the employment of people with disabilities shows that the Federal Government has hired people with disabilities at a higher rate than at any time in the past 33 years.

Our data also shows a steady increase in making our Senior Executive Service more diverse. For example, in 2009, women represented just 31 percent of the SES. Today, they make up 34 percent of these senior leadership positions. We’re also making progress in improving representation along all racial and ethnic lines.

OPM is expanding the data we collect through the annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey to capture information from employees who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. As more LGBT employees self-identify through this powerful tool, agencies will be better equipped to support this important part of our Federal family.

OPM is providing agencies with the tools, strategies, and guidance to help them continue this progress. This week, OPM unveiled the REDI Roadmap, which stands for Recruitment, Engagement, Diversity, and Inclusion, and is designed to make sure that across government, we are using the latest data-driven expertise, digital tools, and collaborative thinking to continue to build, develop, and engage a talented and diverse workforce, now and for years to come.

REDI reflects OPM’s commitment to the President’s vision of ensuring that all segments of society are represented and feel included at every level of America's workforce. You can learn more about the new REDI Roadmap at

This post was originally featured on the White House Blog.

Snippet of data from the REDI Report available at

I’m excited to share with you today the details of OPM’s comprehensive strategy to help the Federal government attract, develop, and retain a talented, engaged, and diverse workforce. We call this effort our REDI Roadmap – our roadmap to better Recruitment, Engagement, Diversity, and Inclusion. 

When I started as OPM Director 16 months ago, I knew that to fully understand the needs of our Federal workforce, I needed to get outside of Washington, D.C. So I travelled across the country, visiting with Federal employees, veterans, job applicants, business and community leaders, and students and career counselors. These conversations gave me incredible insights into what our customers want from us and how we can better support our own employees. And those insights helped provide the foundation for the REDI Roadmap.  

REDI is a data-driven, forward-looking human capital management strategy that reflects our work on behalf of the People and Culture pillar of the President’s Management Agenda. The roadmap will help agencies drive other key presidential initiatives in areas such as diversity and inclusion, closing skills gaps, building the Federal leaders of tomorrow, and fulfilling our commitment to our veterans and people with disabilities. Underlying all of REDI’s initiatives to enhance recruitment and engagement is the importance of diversity and inclusion. 

When it comes to recruitment, our roadmap outlines efforts to improve the way the Federal government attracts, recruits, and hires new talent. We also want to help agencies eliminate barriers to recruiting and hiring the diverse talent they need. By making data-driven decisions, we will improve and tackle key areas, including:

  • Untying hiring knots.
  • Revitalizing
  • Improving the effectiveness of the Pathways Program.
  • Expanding the use of social media tools for strategic recruitment.
  • Enhancing OPM’s role as a premier source for innovative recruitment and hiring tools and services.
  • Expanding partnerships with stakeholders, including colleges and universities.
  • Eliminating barriers to attracting diverse talent to the Senior Executive Service.

Engagement is another key element of REDI. Research in the public and private sectors tells us that the more engaged an employee is, the more productive and effective that worker will be. Research also shows that engagement is tied to service, quality, safety, and retention. The roadmap’s engagement strategy includes:

  • Promoting and expanding the use of the, an interactive data visualization tool.
  • Using social media tools to honor and recognize the Federal workforce.
  • Working with the Chief Learning Officers Council to build a government-wide mentoring hub.
  • Training employees in the New Inclusion Quotient, which expands understanding of how employee engagement and inclusion drives organizational performance.
  • Collaborating with Federal affinity and employee resource groups.
  • Offering customized training solutions.
  • Launching GovConnect, which allows employees to share knowledge, collaborate, and apply their skills to solve agency problems.

You can find the entire REDI report and more information at To learn more, as well as to get a preview of some enhancements planned for USAJOBS, watch today’s announcement.

 This is the REDI Infographic.  This infographic has four sections.      Section one shows four pin graphics with the letter on each.  The green pin shows the letter R, the orange pin shows the letter E, the purple pin shows the letter E, and the blue pin shows the letter I. This spells the acronym REDI, which stands for Recruitment, Engagement, Diversity, and Inclusion. Beneath the four colorful pins the text reads Roadmap, U.S. Office of Personnel Management.  To the right of section one is text that reads REDI, which stands for recruitment, engagement, diversity, and inclusion. Is a comprehensive forward looking human capital management strategy that reflects OPM's work and commitment to the People and Culture pillar of the President's Management Agenda.   Second two is titled Recruitment.  And reads, Consistent with the President's Management Agenda, OPM is partnering with agencies and key stakeholders to continue to improve the way that the Federal Government attracts, recruits, and hires new talent.   There is an image of a map showing waypoints with the following words inside circles, Next Generation, Untie Hiring Knots, Data-driven Decisions, Social Media Tools, Pathways Program, Strategic Partnerships, and SES Hiring Improvements.     Section three is titled Engagement. And reads, Research in the public and private sectors tells us that the more engaged an employee is the more productive and effective the employee will be. Research also shows that engagement is tied to service, quality, safety, and retention.  There is a graphic of colorful tags. Each tag contains text.  Tag 1 shows,, tag 2 shows Government-wide Mentoring Hub, tag 3 shows Social Media Tools, tag 4 shows New Inclusion Quotient (New IQ), tag 5 shows Federal Affinity and Employee Resource Groups, tag 6 shows Customized Training Solutions, tag 7 shows GovConnect.  Section four is titled Diversity and Inclusion. And reads, OPM's REDI Roadmap is designed to make sure we are using the latest data-driven expertise, social media tools, and collaborative thinking to continue to build a Federal workforce that is talented, well-training, engaged, and inclusive, and that draws from the rich diversity of the American people.   Image in this section shows human icons of different colors grouped into shapes and represents American people in the United States and its outlying states and territories.   The footer at the bottom of the infographic contains a hashtag and a website link.  #AmericasWorkforce for twitter site for website

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