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Frequently Asked Questions Retirement

FERCCA

  • The Direct Express® card provides the advantages of direct deposit without requiring a bank account or credit check and is an option for those who prefer a prepaid debit card recommended by the Treasury Department:  
    • Fast and Easy –Federal benefit payments go straight into the Direct Express® card account on payment day each month. There’s no need to wait for the mail to arrive or to make a special trip to cash a check.
    • Safe – There’s no risk of lost or stolen checks, no need to carry large amounts of cash, and card account balances are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) up to the maximum allowed by law.
    • Convenient – Use the card to make everyday purchases everywhere Debit MasterCard® is accepted. Make purchases, pay bills, buy money orders and get cash at thousands of locations nationwide. Use the card 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
      (Visit www.GoDirect.org for more information about fees and the surcharge-free network.)  
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  • The Go Direct campaign has been involved with many of the most significant financial literacy efforts currently in force across the country, including:
    • The Bank On Program
    • FDIC Alliance for Economic Inclusion
    • FDIC Money Smart Curriculum
    • Money Smart Week
      In addition, during the campaign’s long tenure it has developed relationships with local financial literacy coalition leaders, positioning the Go Direct campaign as a dependable community financial education resource in communities around the country.   (Visit www.GoDirect.org for more information about fees and the surcharge-free network.)  
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  • No, the Joint Committee sequestration will not stop delivery of FERS and CSRS annuity checks.  These monthly retirement benefits checks will continue to be issued. 
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  • CSRS Offset is the Civil Service Retirement System with Social Security Offset. It is the same as CSRS, except that is coordinated with Social Security. CSRS Offset was created in 1987 and generally applies to employees who had a break in Federal service after 1983 that lasted longer than 1 year and had at least 5 years of civilian service as of January 1, 1987. It also applies to employees who were hired into a civilian job before 1984, but did not acquire retirement coverage until after 1984 and had at least 5 years of service as of January 1, 1987. CSRS Offset employees are covered by both CSRS and Social Security. You earn retirement credit under CSRS, while also earning credits under Social Security. When you retire from the Government, your retirement benefit is computed in the same way that CSRS benefits are computed. However, when you become eligible for Social Security benefits (usually at age 62), your CSRS retirement benefit is reduced, or offset, by the value of the Social Security benefit you earned while working for the Government. The amount CSRS Offset employees pay for retirement the same amount that CSRS employees pay, however it is reduced, or offset, by Social Security taxes (6.2 % of pay). Agencies contribute a set amount (7% for most employees) to CSRS Offset. Just like CSRS employees, CSRS Offset employees are also are allowed to participate in the Thrift Savings Plan and currently may contribute up to 6% of basic pay, without a Government contribution.
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  • FERS stands for the Federal Employees Retirement System. FERS became effective in 1987 and most new Federal civilian employees hired after 1983 are automatically covered by FERS. FERS is a three-tiered retirement plan. The three components are the:
    • FERS Basic Benefit
    • Social Security Benefit
    • Thrift Savings Plan Benefit
    Most FERS employees pay 0.8% of basic pay for FERS basic benefits. The agency contributes 10.7% or more to FERS. The FERS basic benefit provides retirement, disability, and survivor benefits and may be reduced for early retirement or to provide survivor protection. The FERS basic benefit is computed based on your length of service and the highest average basic pay you earned during any 3 consecutive years of service (know as the "high-3" average pay). Generally, the FERS basic benefit is 1% of your high-3 average pay times your years of creditable service.   FERS employees can currently contribute up to 11% of basic pay to the Thrift Savings Plan. An automatic Government contribution adds 1% of basic pay to every FERS employee's TSP account. The Government adds up to another 4% of basic pay, depending on how much the employee chooses to contribute.
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  • Look at any of your Standard Form 50s (Notifications of Personnel Actions). There's a block that shows your retirement plan. It's Block 30 on all current SF-50s. You'll see a code followed by an acronym that represents your retirement plan. Most Federal employees are in one of four possible retirement plans. They are: Retirement Plan Commonly Called SF-50 Civil Service Retirement System CSRS Code 1 or 6 Civil Service Retirement System and Social Security CSRS Offset Code C or E Social Security Only FICA Code 2 Federal Employees Retirement System FERS Code K, L, M, or N "FICA" indicates Social Security coverage on your SF-50. For example, your retirement coverage as it appears on the SF-50 may be CSRS and FICA instead of CSRS Offset or FERS and FICA instead of FERS. If your agency does not use Standard Form 50s, you can find your retirement plan on the form it uses to notify you of personnel actions.
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  • FERCCA is the Federal Erroneous Retirement Coverage Corrections Act. It is a law that addresses the long-term harm to retirement planning created when employees are put in the wrong retirement plan.
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  • It depends on what your retirement coverage error was and how long you were in the wrong retirement plan. FERCCA may provide you one or all of the following:
    • You may have an opportunity to choose another retirement plan;
    • You may be reimbursed for certain out-of-pocket expenses you paid as a result of a coverage error;
    • You may benefit from certain changes in the rules about how some of your Government service counts toward retirement; and
    • You may be able to make-up contributions to the Thrift Savings Plan and get lost earnings on those contributions as well.
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  • Social Security-Only means coverage under Social Security without also being covered under either CSRS or FERS. You would have Social Security-Only coverage if you were hired under an appointment that is excluded from CSRS or FERS. Usually employees serving under temporary appointments (limited to 1 year or less), intermittent employees, and other appointments that would not be expected to last at least 5 years (such as term and excepted indefinite appointments) are excluded from CSRS. Employees serving under temporary (limited to 1 year or less) appointments and intermittent employees are generally excluded from FERS.
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  • We believe that the number of employees in the wrong retirement plan is very small. Agencies have discovered and corrected many retirement coverage errors. However, we are certain some employees still are in the wrong retirement plan. If you have not worked for the Federal Government continuously since 1983, or you have had changes in appointment types and retirement plans, then you may want to ask your agency to review your retirement coverage to ensure that it is correct.
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