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Frequently Asked Questions Insurance

  • FEHB and FEDVIP are separate programs. While some FEHB plans offer dental or vision benefits as part of their benefit package, only those carriers under contract to OPM are FEDVIP plans. FEDVIP plans offer comprehensive dental and vision benefits. FEDVIP is not part of the FEHB program, and it is different from any supplementary dental and vision product your FEHB plan may offer.
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  • No, unlike FEHB, employees may not opt out of premium conversion for FEDVIP. If employees do not wish to have premium conversion for FEDVIP, they should not enroll.
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  • The reductions start at the beginning of the 2nd month after your 65th birthday or the beginning of the 2nd month after your retirement date, whichever is later. For example: Pierre retired December 31, 1999. He will turn 65 on March 15, 2005. The reductions for his Basic and Optional insurance (if applicable) will start May 1, 2005. Here's another example: Selena was 67 years old when she retired on December 31, 1999. Since she was already past 65 when she retired, the reductions for her Basic and Optional insurance (if applicable) will start February 1, 2000.
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  • This means that the person (a designated beneficiary or person entitled under the order of precedence) advised OFEGLI, in writing, that he/she does not want the money he/she is entitled to receive. A disclaimer by default means that the person doesn't ever file a claim form to claim the benefits. If someone entitled to benefits disclaims them, he/she cannot tell OFEGLI who should get the disclaimed benefits. Rather, OFEGLI must treat those benefits as if the person disclaiming had died before the Insured. If the person disclaiming was a designated beneficiary, OFEGLI would pay the disclaimed share equally to the remaining beneficiaries. If there are no remaining beneficiaries or the person disclaiming was not a designated beneficiary, OFEGLI will pay the proceeds according to the next step in the order of precedence. Perhaps a few examples will help.
    Mary designated John and Susan for 50% each. Mary dies. John disclaims his share. It does not matter that John wanted his mother, Laura, to receive the benefits. OFEGLI will pay 100% to Susan.
    Here's another example.
    Raul is single, childless, and did not designate a beneficiary. Raul dies. His parents are entitled to the benefits based on the order of precedence. His father disclaims his share of the benefits. OFEGLI will pay 100% to his mother.
    And here's a final example.
    Cyndi is married with one child. She did not designate a beneficiary. Cyndi dies. Her husband is entitled to the benefits based on the order of precedence. He disclaims the benefits. OFEGLI moves to the next step in the order of precedence and pays 100% to Cyndi's child.
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  • You must apply within 60 days of:
    • the date your marriage ended, or
    • the date the employing office notified you that your qualifying court order (or your former spouse's election) entitled you to coverage, whichever is later.
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  • Read about FEDVIP Qualifying Life Events.
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  • A Living Benefit payment is a lump sum payment to those who are terminally ill and have a documented medical prognosis showing a life expectancy of no more than nine months. You are eligible to elect a Living Benefit if you are an employee, annuitant, or compensationer and you are enrolled in the FEGLI Program. Employees can choose a full or partial (a multiple of $1,000) Living Benefit. Annuitants and compensationers can elect only a full Living Benefit. A Living Benefit is equal to the Basic Life insurance amount, plus any extra benefit for persons under age 45, that would be in effect nine months after the date of the Office of Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (OFEGLI) receives a completed claim for Living Benefits form. If you have assigned your life insurance, you cannot elect a Living Benefit. Living Benefit payments are reduced by a nominal amount (4.9%) to make up for lost earnings to the Life Insurance Fund because of the early payment of benefits. The election of Living Benefits has no effect on the amount of any Optional life insurance. You will continue to pay premiums for any Optional insurance you have. You must contact OFEGLI at 1-800-633-4542 to obtain the form to elect Living Benefits (Form FE-8). This form is not available from your human resources office or the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).
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  • As a result of health care reform, beginning January 1, 2011, children of Federal enrollees will be covered by their parent’s FEHB Self and Family enrollment until their 26th birthday (plus a 31-day temporary extension of coverage), even if the child previously lost coverage because he/she turned 22.
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  • If you are the surviving spouse and you receive a survivor annuity, you can continue the deceased's Self and Family enrollment for all eligible family members. The enrollment will be changed to your name and premiums withheld from your survivor annuity. If you are the only person eligible for coverage, the enrollment will be changed to Self Only. After the change, the carrier will send you a new identification card.
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  • Federal and U.S. Postal Service employees eligible for FEHB coverage (whether or not enrolled) and annuitants/survivor annuitants/compensationers (regardless of FEHB eligibility) are eligible to enroll.
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