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Our Director Director's Blog


I am excited today to release an insightful report on Women in Federal Service, which draws on OPM’s deep reservoir of data to shine a light on opportunities for women in Federal service. One of my top priorities as Director of OPM is to make sure women have a seat at every decision table. This report not only illustrates our significant progress toward that goal, but also points to what we still need to accomplish.

For me, the first step in any challenge is to take a look at the data. We looked at how women are doing in the Federal workforce from the perspectives of work-life flexibilities, opportunities to move into leadership, and pay equity.

The data revealed some positive and gratifying trend lines. Women are increasingly moving into leadership roles compared to their counterparts a decade ago. Today, they make up 34.4 percent of senior executives in the Federal Government, compared to estimates of 14.6 percent in the private sector. Younger women are doing especially well. Women entering the workforce now are more likely to be on a management track than they were a decade ago. And while we are proud of the progress we’ve made, the data shows a lingering gender gap within our Senior Executive Service. Clearly, we have work to do.  

We’ve also made great progress closing the pay gap between women and men, especially in leadership positions. Within the Senior Executive Service, the pay gap is nearly non-existent. As of 2012, women made 99.2 cents on the dollar compared to men. The gap has also closed dramatically among women in the 25-to-34 age bracket, showing that younger women are more likely to be paid similarly to their male counterparts. We’re thrilled to see so much progress.

We also know that work-life flexibilities are crucial for women – and men. They want the ability to manage their personal lives outside of work, whether that means helping to take care of children or older parents. Among women who take advantage of workplace flexibility programs, more than three-quarters are satisfied with those opportunities. 

This report is just the start. I’m committed to making sure opportunities for women in government continue to grow. Last month, I unveiled the REDI Roadmap, which stands for Recruitment, Engagement, Diversity, and Inclusion and provides a data-driven strategy for helping agencies reach one of President Obama’s major workforce goals: a diverse and inclusive Federal workforce at every level of government.

We want to make sure that women are fully represented at every level of government to create a stronger Federal service.

This is an infographic of the Women's Report from the 2014 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey results. The top of the infographic shows the web address to the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey website at and hashtag #FEVS.The infographic has 4 sections. In section 1, the title reads, Women in Federal Service, A Seat at Every Table. United States Office of Personnel Management. This section also shows a series of women and men avatars seated around a table.  OPM Director Katherine Archuleta's quote reads:  We're working hard to remove the barriers to women having seats at decision tables at every level of Federal service. In section 2, the Title reads, Leadership. Image of a pie chart that shows 14.6 percent of women executives in the private sector. Another image of a pie chart which shows 34 percent of women executives in senior executive service positions in the Federal workforce. Also in section 2, the Title reads, Workplace Flexibilities. Image of a bar chart which represents men and women who are satisfied with workplace flexibilities, like telework, child care, and the alternative work schedule. Section 3 shows images of people representing Federal employees and their family members, from babies to the elderly who benefit from work life policies. OPM Director Katherine Archuleta's quote reads,  our work life policies are continually evolving to make the balance of caring for families and pursuing a career complementary, rather than contradictory. In section 4, the title reads, Closing the Pay Gap. The subtitle reads, Federal Women Executives in senior executive service positions. Image 1 shows the amount of money females in senior executive service positions were paid to the dollar compared to their male counterparts. In 1992, it was 97.6 cents. In 2012, it was 99.2 cents. Under the subtitle, Federal Women in White Collar Jobs, in 1992, women in White Collar Jobs were paid 70 cents to the dollar. In 2012, Women in White Collar Jobs were paid 87 cents to the dollar. This section also shows women and men avatars seated around a table. Images of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management's social media accounts. Find U.S. OPM on Twitter at Find OPM Director on Twitter at Find us on Facebook at Find us on Twitter at Find us on LinkedIn at Find us on YouTube at, and find us on Instagram at very bottom of the infographic shows the web address to the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey website at and hashtag #FEVS.

I’m excited to share with you today the details of OPM’s comprehensive strategy to help the Federal government attract, develop, and retain a talented, engaged, and diverse workforce. We call this effort our REDI Roadmap – our roadmap to better Recruitment, Engagement, Diversity, and Inclusion. 

When I started as OPM Director 16 months ago, I knew that to fully understand the needs of our Federal workforce, I needed to get outside of Washington, D.C. So I travelled across the country, visiting with Federal employees, veterans, job applicants, business and community leaders, and students and career counselors. These conversations gave me incredible insights into what our customers want from us and how we can better support our own employees. And those insights helped provide the foundation for the REDI Roadmap.  

REDI is a data-driven, forward-looking human capital management strategy that reflects our work on behalf of the People and Culture pillar of the President’s Management Agenda. The roadmap will help agencies drive other key presidential initiatives in areas such as diversity and inclusion, closing skills gaps, building the Federal leaders of tomorrow, and fulfilling our commitment to our veterans and people with disabilities. Underlying all of REDI’s initiatives to enhance recruitment and engagement is the importance of diversity and inclusion. 

When it comes to recruitment, our roadmap outlines efforts to improve the way the Federal government attracts, recruits, and hires new talent. We also want to help agencies eliminate barriers to recruiting and hiring the diverse talent they need. By making data-driven decisions, we will improve and tackle key areas, including:

  • Untying hiring knots.
  • Revitalizing
  • Improving the effectiveness of the Pathways Program.
  • Expanding the use of social media tools for strategic recruitment.
  • Enhancing OPM’s role as a premier source for innovative recruitment and hiring tools and services.
  • Expanding partnerships with stakeholders, including colleges and universities.
  • Eliminating barriers to attracting diverse talent to the Senior Executive Service.

Engagement is another key element of REDI. Research in the public and private sectors tells us that the more engaged an employee is, the more productive and effective that worker will be. Research also shows that engagement is tied to service, quality, safety, and retention. The roadmap’s engagement strategy includes:

  • Promoting and expanding the use of the, an interactive data visualization tool.
  • Using social media tools to honor and recognize the Federal workforce.
  • Working with the Chief Learning Officers Council to build a government-wide mentoring hub.
  • Training employees in the New Inclusion Quotient, which expands understanding of how employee engagement and inclusion drives organizational performance.
  • Collaborating with Federal affinity and employee resource groups.
  • Offering customized training solutions.
  • Launching GovConnect, which allows employees to share knowledge, collaborate, and apply their skills to solve agency problems.

You can find the entire REDI report and more information at To learn more, as well as to get a preview of some enhancements planned for USAJOBS, watch today’s announcement.

 This is the REDI Infographic.  This infographic has four sections.      Section one shows four pin graphics with the letter on each.  The green pin shows the letter R, the orange pin shows the letter E, the purple pin shows the letter E, and the blue pin shows the letter I. This spells the acronym REDI, which stands for Recruitment, Engagement, Diversity, and Inclusion. Beneath the four colorful pins the text reads Roadmap, U.S. Office of Personnel Management.  To the right of section one is text that reads REDI, which stands for recruitment, engagement, diversity, and inclusion. Is a comprehensive forward looking human capital management strategy that reflects OPM's work and commitment to the People and Culture pillar of the President's Management Agenda.   Second two is titled Recruitment.  And reads, Consistent with the President's Management Agenda, OPM is partnering with agencies and key stakeholders to continue to improve the way that the Federal Government attracts, recruits, and hires new talent.   There is an image of a map showing waypoints with the following words inside circles, Next Generation, Untie Hiring Knots, Data-driven Decisions, Social Media Tools, Pathways Program, Strategic Partnerships, and SES Hiring Improvements.     Section three is titled Engagement. And reads, Research in the public and private sectors tells us that the more engaged an employee is the more productive and effective the employee will be. Research also shows that engagement is tied to service, quality, safety, and retention.  There is a graphic of colorful tags. Each tag contains text.  Tag 1 shows,, tag 2 shows Government-wide Mentoring Hub, tag 3 shows Social Media Tools, tag 4 shows New Inclusion Quotient (New IQ), tag 5 shows Federal Affinity and Employee Resource Groups, tag 6 shows Customized Training Solutions, tag 7 shows GovConnect.  Section four is titled Diversity and Inclusion. And reads, OPM's REDI Roadmap is designed to make sure we are using the latest data-driven expertise, social media tools, and collaborative thinking to continue to build a Federal workforce that is talented, well-training, engaged, and inclusive, and that draws from the rich diversity of the American people.   Image in this section shows human icons of different colors grouped into shapes and represents American people in the United States and its outlying states and territories.   The footer at the bottom of the infographic contains a hashtag and a website link.  #AmericasWorkforce for twitter site for website

As the first Latina Director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, one of my highest priorities is to recruit a diverse Federal workforce. As part of that effort, last week I attended the League of United Latin American Citizens’ annual conference. LULAC is the oldest and largest Latino civil rights organization in the United States. For 85 years, it has fought for civil rights, education rights, legal rights, housing rights, and employment rights.

Director Archuleta Speaking at LULACLULAC shares OPM’s goal of promoting a diverse and inclusive workplace. We both know how important it is to have a government that looks like and truly represents the people we serve. Americans benefit from the talent, the wisdom, the experience, and the insights of people from every community in our country.

We do a lot of great work with organizations like LULAC. Along with other Federal agencies, OPM is a partner in its Federal Training Institute, which helps to train and mentor the next generation of Latino leaders.

As part of the President’s Management Agenda, OPM is placing a renewed emphasis on leadership pipelines. We want to ensure that all groups, including Latinos, are fully represented in the workplace. We are working on an onboarding program to make sure that new Senior Executive Service members have the support and coaching they need, not only when they first begin their assignment, but throughout their tenure. And we are focusing on mentoring. Connecting with leaders in our own communities can give us the help and direction we need. We all need mentors and should strive to be mentors to others. 

The National Council of La Raza is another leader in the Latino community, and I look forward to speaking at their annual conference in Los Angeles next week. While I’m there, I will also meet with Latino students at several colleges, sharing with them what the Federal government’s employment needs are and asking what would entice them to consider a career in Federal service.

When I visit with these organizations and their members, I get the chance to do something I can’t do anywhere else: Hear firsthand the perspectives I need to make our strategies the best they can possibly be. My commitment to a diverse and inclusive Federal workforce is unshakable. Together, we can make sure Latinos are represented at every level of Federal service, especially at every decision-making table.

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