Click here to skip navigation
This website uses features which update page content based on user actions. If you are using assistive technology to view web content, please ensure your settings allow for the page content to update after initial load (this is sometimes called "forms mode"). Additionally, if you are using assistive technology and would like to be notified of items via alert boxes, please follow this link to enable alert boxes for your session profile.
An official website of the United States Government.
Skip Navigation

In This Section

Classification & Qualifications General Schedule Qualification Standards

Trade Specialist Series, 1140

Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration

Individual Occupational Requirements

Education

Undergraduate Education: Major study -- global business management, global public policy, international finance, business administration, textile and apparel studies, political science, economics, marketing, international trade, international business, international affairs, international relations, international economics, or other related fields of study.

Graduate Education: Major study -- international policy, international commerce, international management, intercultural relations, international development, global economy, government and foreign affairs, international business, international trade, international economics, international affairs, international relations, or other related fields of study.

or

Experience

General Experience (for GS-5 positions): Experience that demonstrated a basic knowledge and understanding of the commercial movement of goods and services, including the processes of international commerce; underlying financial and tariff structures; the promotion and facilitation of exporting; foreign market research and development; import/export laws and controls; or related activities.

Specialized Experience (for positions above GS-5): Experience that demonstrated the application of knowledge of international economic and political factors influencing the flow of goods and services between countries; the impact of government policies and regulations, business conditions, and market structures on international competitiveness; or of problems and techniques relating to the sales and marketing of goods and services in world markets.

The following examples of qualifying specialized experience represent a range of experience from the GS-7 through GS-15 grade levels:

  • Providing guidance and assistance to businesses involved in, or seeking involvement in, export of goods and services to foreign countries when the work applied understanding of economic (exchange rate, duties, and subsidies), business (role of goods involved in partners economies, competitiveness of U.S. products, foreign market potentials), and geo-political considerations impacting movement of goods and services internationally. Business export or trade assistance based only upon knowledge of administrative processes (e.g., licensing, customs documentation, documentation of government-controlled issues, etc.) would not be qualifying.

  • Engaging in international marketing or performing international market research when such activity required identifying foreign sales opportunities, adapting export promotion techniques or products to conditions in foreign markets, or designing strategies for overcoming competition or market entry barriers in overseas markets.

  • Analysis and interpretation of international trade issues, conditions, or events in support of decision-making, policy formulation, or program development activities of government or industry executives concerned with the U.S. position in world trade.

  • Analysis of foreign market characteristics, domestic industry conditions, and trade patterns in specific commodities to support negotiation and/or administration of bilateral or multilateral international trade agreements.

  • Development and substantive analysis of international trade data and information when the primary purpose of, and knowledge applied to, such work involved financial, business, or geo-political parameters of international commerce.

  • Monitoring, investigation, and analysis of import/export data and information to document adherence by U.S. trading partners to trade agreements, tariff provisions, court-ordered import limitations, or other established import controls.

  • Assisting State or local governments, chambers of commerce, or trade associations in trade promotion activities.

Control Panel