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Classification & Qualifications General Schedule Qualification Standards

Industrial Hygiene Series, 0690

Individual Occupational Requirements

Basic Requirements:

  1. Degree: industrial hygiene; or a branch of engineering, physical science, or life science that included 12 semester hours in chemistry, including organic chemistry, and 18 additional semester hours of courses in any combination of chemistry, physics, engineering, health physics, environmental health, biostatistics, biology, physiology, toxicology, epidemiology, or industrial hygiene. Courses in the history or teaching of chemistry are not acceptable.

    OR

  2. Combination of education and experience -- at least 12 semester hours of course work in chemistry, including organic chemistry, and 18 additional semester hours as specified in A above, plus appropriate experience or additional education.

Evaluation of Education: All science or engineering courses offered in fulfillment of the above requirements must be acceptable for credit toward the completion of a standard 4-year professional curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree in science or engineering at an accredited college or university.

Evaluation of Experience: Qualifying experience may have been obtained in field, laboratory, engineering, or other environment if the work provided a means of obtaining a professional knowledge of the theory and application of the principles of industrial hygiene and closely related sciences such as physics and engineering controls. Such work must have involved experience in all of the following areas: the acquisition of quantitative and qualitative data, and the measurement of exposures for a variety of chemical, physical, and biological stresses; the analysis of the data acquired and the prediction of probable effects of exposures on the health and well-being of workers; and the selection and recommendation of appropriate controls, including management, medical, engineering, education or training, and personal protective equipment.

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